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Let’s make kutuki. Ali! Six Hopi women and girls gathered together on June 17, 2017 to share the art of making kutuki while also learning more conversational Hopi. Kutuki is parched corn. Pisa (fine sand) is heated and the humita (corn kernels) are popped in the hot sand while stirring rapidly over a hot flame. Once the humita has popped, it is sifted through a basket to remove the sand. Hopi men make the stirring sticks for the women. The sticks are made from the very hard wood of the greasewood bush. Roanna Kagenveama shared her knowledge of the process and Anita Poleahla hosted the gathering at her house. Askwali! The ladies ate somiviki for lunch. Kwangwa! Yummy! Through the generous support of the Food Farm Communications Fund, Mesa Media was able to sponsor this event to bring together the generations. Everyone practiced speaking in Hopi. Oral transmission of Hopi food traditions perpetuates the age-old practice maintained by Hopi people for centuries. Askwali to all who participated, hosted, shared and documented. All photos by Peter Bungart.

Practice some Hopilavayi with these phrases that match the photos.

Wuuti ang taynuma. The woman is looking around.

Kutuklawu. Making parched corn.

Kutukit angqw ipwanta. Taking the parched corn out.

Kutuki tusayat angqw iniwta. Parched corn in a sifter basket.

Pisa muki’iwma, kutuksivut angqw. Fine sand getting hot, inside the pot.

Humita. Corn kernels.

Maana kutuklawu. The girl is making parched corn

Wuuti kutuklawu. The woman is making parched corn.

Noonova or nonva (Walap lavayi). Eating. Hatikot, somivikit, nit wiikwivi (Walap lavayi) /wilqaviki (Songoopap lavayi)/wiviqaviki (Orayep lavayi). Lima beans, somiviki, and fry bread.

Hopi artisans are sharing the mysteries of their culture at the 70th Hopi Marketplace at the Museum of Northern Arizona this weekend.

The oldest Hopi art show in the world will feature traditional music, dancing, food and art, but youll also find modern Hopi life, including a special appearance by Casper Lomayesva, a Hopi/Dine reggae recording artist performing at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Orpheum Theatre, 15 W. Aspen. Tickets are $10. Lomayesva will be at the Museum signing his new CD on Sunday.

Also on Sunday, theres a Creative Corner for decorating cookies with Hopi petal patterns from 14 p.m. in the Branigar Courtyard.

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Ten Hopi women and girls gathered together on June 24, 2017 to share the art of making sakwasiwviqaviki and to practice Hopilavayi. This Hopi food is a blue corn onion tortilla that is often served with beans. Kwangwa! Yummy! The ingredients are blue corn flour, baking powder, milk, eggs and chopped onion. Joannie Takala shared her recipe and Loretta Goldtooth hosted the gathering at her house. Askwali!The ladies shared lunch and talked in Hopi the whole day. Uni! Through the generous support of the Food Farm Communications Fund, Mesa Media was able to sponsor this event to bring together the generations.  Oral transmission of Hopi food traditions perpetuates the age-old practice maintained by Hopi people for centuries. Askwali to all who participated, hosted, shared and documented. All photos by Peter Bungart.

 

 

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